Morning Glory (2010)

Directed by: Roger Michell

Written by: Aline Brosh McKenna

Starring: Rachel McAdams, Harrison Ford, Diane Keaton, Patrick Wilson

Genre: Comedy / Drama / Romance

Runtime: 107 minutes

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Plot:

An upstart television producer accepts the challenge of reviving a struggling morning show program with warring co-hosts. [imdb]

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I never had high hopes for this film, thinking that it would be the chick flick a production company would churn out to earn crazy money. As it turns out, I was wrong in both ways. It was a very pleasing, smart, and enjoyable film that did not actually made a lot of money in the box-office.

First, the comparison between this and Network is just out-of-place. That was a dark drama-satire, this is a lighthearted drama-comedy. Definitely not the same.

Rachel McAdams is delightful in her role, playing her cheerful character with such bliss and maturity. Harrison Ford is deadpan hilarious as a serious newscaster misplaced in a morning show. Although slightly underused, Diane Keaton proves that she still has the comedic kick that she was known for. Now, though Patrick Wilson delivers his character as McAdams’ lover efficiently, he was utterly unnecessary. The movie could have lived without him, even giving the movie a faster pace.

Still, I won’t take any merits from this movie. The direction supports the film with ample support without overpowering the movie. The film is more of a showcase for the screenplay, which definitely delivered 2010 some of the funniest lines and scenes of the year, but the direction itself keeps the movie away from the annoying chick flick it could have been.

The editing equips the film with the style it needs to have to be able for the film to be distinct from the rest of the lighthearted drama-comedies out there. The music gives color to this already colorful story, adding more life.

The true reason that I love this film (yes, I love this movie) is that it packs us with skilled actors to showcase really hilarious scenes. The combination of slapstick and dialogue humor is brilliant. The humor itself is effective. It never feels forced or unnatural, and that quality is what most comedies this time have a problem. Sure, they have scenarios that could have been laugh-out-loud moments, but, more often than not, they feel so right in your face. Well, not here. I could rewatch and rewatch this film and honestly, I would not hate it.

My main criticism to this movie, aside from Wilson’s unnecessary character, is the inconsistency in the mood. Of course, it is enjoyable, much more than I expected it to be. However, some viewers may find a hard time adjusting to the frequent mood swings in this film. It’s like one second, happy music, right after ten seconds, sad music. The music was successful to make the mood, but as a whole, it somewhat disappointed on establishing a smooth flow of atmosphere.

Also, it does have a not-so-good opening scene. They say it’s an artistic choice, but I don’t buy the style. It really feels awkward watching the scene as it goes bigger on-screen. I somewhat saw the meaning of it in repeated viewings, but I think it still could have been better.

However, no matter how flawed this movie is, this is still one of the most enjoyable films of 2010, and don’t feel bad if you will love it, too. Definitely a movie that you’ll watch again and again.

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Rating: 8/10

I was hesitating to go with this or 7.5, but hell, it’s more enjoyable that most films in recent memory.

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Watch it if….. you want to have a good time, if you want to see Harrison Ford do a comedy, if you want to see Diane Keaton in one of her most hilarious performances, if an out-of-place romance don’t bother you at all.

Skip it if….. you want a flawless movie to see, if you don’t like McAdams’ energetic acting, if you expect an in-depth view at broadcasting, if you expect a Network-type of movie.

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If you want to see more of my writing stuff in my home blog, visit http://mylastoscar.wordpress.com/. Enjoy reading!

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